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technologies

Concern about the lack of available talent in the tech sector should come as no surprise at this point — after all, they're nothing new. Back in 2019, for example, nearly four out of five executives said they were concerned about the lack of qualified talent to fill existing tech roles. That concern is around today, but now it's just one of many human capital concerns tech employers face.

From the unprecedented demand associated with high-value tech roles to the impact upskilling and reskilling can deliver to the imperative for improving EDI&A and more, let's unpack four high-level trends that will be top of mind for tech employers in 2022.

demand can't seem to get any higher — but it will

Today's hiring market has job seekers in the driver's seat as never before, and nowhere is that more apparent than when it comes to tech roles. In fact, it's practically impossible to overstate the extent to which demand for tech professionals has skyrocketed in recent years. For proof, just consider the following figures, which chart increases in the number of job postings during the past four years for various tech specialties, from one Bain report:

  • DevOps positions: 443 percent increase
  • machine learning positions: 417 percent increase
  • software engineering positions: 69 percent increase
  • data science positions: 67 percent increase

High as those numbers might seem, the longstanding talent scarcity in the tech sector isn't about to end any time soon. So if you think the trend toward infinitely intensifying demand is going away, think again.

The flip side of that, unfortunately, is that retention woes will likely continue unabated in the tech space. Especially given broader marketplace trends — such as the recent uptick in average wage increases for employees who change jobs, for example — it stands to reason that many employers will be hard pressed to hold on to high-value tech resources in 2022.

upskilling and reskilling take center stage

Creating talent, rather than finding it, will be among the most effective ways for tech employers to counteract chronic talent shortages in the tech space in the year ahead. In fact, perhaps that's why 42 percent of executives indicated that they planned to unveil new upskilling and reskilling initiatives in 2022. That's a positive sign — and the rationale for doing so should be clear enough.

For starters, there's a demonstrated link between successful upskilling and reskilling initiatives and overall employee retention, which remains a thorny challenge in the tech space (as noted above). Studies show that nearly three out of four workers would be much more engaged at work if employers allocated additional resources to learning, development and training programs. Absent those programs, however, organizations will face negative consequences in turn. In one survey of tech employees, for example, "limited career progression" was cited as the primary reason that 41 percent were considering leaving their jobs.

One final point to bear in mind around upskilling and reskilling: These initiatives, like everything else your enterprise is gearing up for in 2022, should be built with flexibility top of mind. Think: platforms and tools that are available on an on-demand, platform-agnostic basis to employees, whenever and wherever they want them. That's the best way to enable your team members to grow in their careers and prepare for the future without feeling constrained.

new threats of disruption from "hyperscalers"

Need one more reason to redouble your focus on upskilling and reskilling — and to generally do everything you can to advance your learning and development capabilities, and promote and advance talent from within? In that case, look no further than "hyperscalers," or large enterprises looking to expand across multiple verticals.

The outsized scale of these behemoths means that they have outsized access to resources — and despite being relatively new to the tech talent ecosystem, they have significant clout among candidates. While the dynamics of supply and demand have long been imbalanced in the tech talent market, hyperscalers' incursion into the space is yet another turn of the screw. And as these companies gobble up larger and larger shares of available tech candidates, they're going to create unprecedented talent acquisition headaches for even the largest legacy companies in turn.

time to finally move the needle on EDI&A

While the conversation about equity, diversity, inclusion and access (EDI&A) has been going on for years in tech, 2022 may well prove to be a tipping point. Why?

For one, because moving the needle on EDI&A so clearly aligns with what the tech workforce wants that at this point it should be regarded as a core business objective. For example, there's the fact that nearly half of tech workers would consider moving to a different company if it had a more mature EDI&A strategy in place than their current employer — and leading organizations appear to be responding. Google, for example, announced an initiative to increase the percentage of underrepresented groups on their leadership team by 30 percent in the next few years, while Johnson & Johnson has committed to increasing their percentage of Black vice presidents and managers within the company by 50 percent by 2025. With companies facing higher levels of scrutiny around EDI&A plans and outcomes, what's more, many will feel pressured to disclose EDI&A-related data about the composition of their workforces. All of which is a recipe for more progress around EDI&A in the tech space than ever before.

At this point, in other words, it seems tech employers recognize that implementing high-impact EDI&A initiatives is much more than just the right thing to do. Rather, with demand for tech talent approaching a fever pitch, these organizations understand the importance of embracing broadly inclusive hiring practices. Casting the widest-possible net — and perhaps tapping the capabilities of a proven talent partner — is going to be the best and most viable talent strategy for most tech employers moving forward.

takeaways

  • From hard-to-find DevOps experts to business-critical data scientists, the demand for value-adding tech pros is going through the roof, and the size of the candidate pool isn't keeping pace. So expect these tech resources to continue to command sky-high salaries, even if they're working remotely — and even as serious retention challenges remain.
  • Rolling out robust upskilling and reskilling initiatives will be among the most viable paths forward for tech employers struggling to acquire talent in the external market. It can also be an effective bulwark against attrition as well. Look for upskilling and reskilling to take center stage.
  • "Hyperscalers" — large enterprises looking to expand across multiple verticals — have become major players in the tech talent landscape, and they're creating a host of talent acquisition challenges for legacy companies. This is only going to intensify in the year ahead.
  • Moving from talk to plans, action and measurable outcomes around EDI&A is going to be table stakes for today's most competitive employers — and be a differentiator when it comes to the relative strength or weakness of many employer brands. But the tech workforce has clearly voiced its preferences in this department, and the risk of attrition is going to be high for any company that doesn't toe the line. In other words, it's time for tech employers to finally move the needle on EDI&A.

national salaries

Let's review the salaries for entry-level, mid-level and senior-level positions.

data
data entry-level mid-level senior-level
big data
data warehouse/business intelligence developer $101,024 - $127,904 $127,904 - $149,984 $149,984 - $168,189
Hadoop developer $108,192 - $135,008 $135,008 - $160,096 $160,096 - $180,064
software development architect $100,000 - $125,024 $125,024 - $163,020 $163,020 - $192,652
database administration
Oracle database administrator $84,768 - $106,080 $106,080 - $130,016 $130,016 - $160,096
SQL-server database administrator $80,958 - $104,889 $104,889 - $135,435 $135,435 - $145,632
database development
ETL developer $90,016 - $114,976 $114,976 - $140,384 $140,384 - $172,512
Oracle developer $88,583 - $119,937 $119,937 - $146,834 $146,834 - $173,673
SQL-server developer $86,509 - $114,210 $114,210 - $138,355 $138,355 - $167,329
enterprise software
enterprise software entry-level mid-level senior-level
collaboration tools
SharePoint developer $94,953 - $118,758 $118,758 - $136,559 $136,559 - $170,640
CRM/ERP
Oracle applications developer $104,500 - $118,757 $118,757- $140,095 $140,095 - $170,697
PEGA developer $105,000 - $118,813 $118,813 - $143,913 $143,913 - $175,000
Salesforce administrator $77,472 - $97,504 $97,504 - $120,032 $120,032 - $146,656
Salesforce developer $100,704 - $125,024 $125,024 - $150,880 $150,880 - $180,064
SAP apps developer $95,008 - $116,512 $116,512 - $145,632 $145,632 - $176,864
SharePoint administrator $68,128 - $83,232 $83,232 - $103,008 $103,008 - $125,024
functional areas
functional areas entry-level mid-level senior-level
business analysis
business analyst $96,140 - $106,911 $106,911 - $131,617 $131,617 - $164,704
data analyst $77,792 - $104,032 $104,033 - $141,351 $141,351 - $149,697
enterprise architecture
enterprise architect $67,824 - $95,792 $95,792 - $122,736 $122,736 - $151,920
project management
agile coach $102,512 - $125,040 $125,041 - $163,037 $163,037 - $173,112
product manager $90,923 - $130,269 $130,269 - $141,024 $141,024 - $174,688
product owner $60,736 - $79,685 $79,685 - $108,826 $108,826 - $148,034
program manager $90,438 - $117,000 $117,000 - $151,154 $151,154 - $191,464
project coordinator $45,760 - $65,624 $65,624 - $92,872 $92,872 - $122,366
project manager $92,872 - $122,366 $122,366 - $152,734 $152,734 - $172,809
scrum master $86,258 - $109,045 $109,045 - $139,478 $139,478 - $170,978
technical architect $65,624 - $92,872 $92,872 - $122,366 $122,366 - $152,734
QA/testing
automated QA tester $87,520 - $112,416 $112,416 - $138,336 $138,336 - $165,088
manual QA tester $82,528 - $104,032 $104,032 - $130,016 $130,016 - $157,792
performance engineer (QA) $83,633 - $111,178 $111,178 - $137,849 $137,849 - $163,454
technical writing
instructional designer $61,647 - $83,103 $83,103 - $131,224 $131,224 - $158,344
technical writer $74,651 - $100,008 $100,008 - $126,507 $126,507 - $169,518
infrastructure
infrastructure entry-level mid-level senior-level
desktop/help desk
desktop/help desk support technician $52,686 - $68,494 $68,494 - $92,943 $92,943 - $119,039
network engineering
network administrator $69,316 - $88,717 $88,717 - $125,328 $125,328 - $148,967
systems administrative engineering
Linux/Unix systems engineer $87,520 - $114,400 $114,400 - $142,560 $142,560 - $174,688
site reliability engineer $82,528 - $106,016 $106,016 - $130,016 $130,016 - $160,096
storage administrator $76,277 - $94,333 $94,333 - $124,092 $124,092 - $151,605
virtualization engineer/cloud developer/cloud engineer $83,700 - $115,332 $115,332 - $141,275 $141,275 - $174,515
Windows systems engineer $82,016 - $103,392 $103,392 - $130,016 $103,392 - $159,456
security
security entry-level mid-level senior-level
network engineering
certified ethical hacker (CEH)/penetration tester $115,240 - $140,264 $140,264 - $155,451 $155,451 - $185,072
cybersecurity engineer $82,528 - $117,744 $117,744 - $141,032 $141,032 - $176,496
network engineer (Cisco or Juniper) $67,205 - $88,130 $88,130 - $122,026 $122,026 - $154,189
network security engineer $85,024 - $108,000 $108,000 - $135,264 $135,264 - $162,528
security analyst $77,472 - $100,064 $100,064 - $130,078 $130,078 - $159,712
software development
software development entry-level mid-level senior-level
application architecture
applications architect $77,984 - $97,504 $97,504 - $122,208 $122,208 - $149,600
software architect $87,791 - $126,620 $126,620 - $158,849 $158,849 - $192,652
software development engineer in test $84,011 - $110,136 $110,136 - $140,462 $140,462 - $170,102
devops
build and release engineer/configuration engineer $94,067 - $126,901 $126,901 - $147,114 $147,114 - $181,927
devops developer $100,704 - $125,024 $125,024 - $150,880 $150,880- $176,864
software engineering
.NET developer $93,232 - $117,488 $117,488 - $135,024 $135,024 - $162,544
Android developer $66,528 - $85,024 $85,024 - $114,400 $114,400 - $145,632
artificial intelligence (AI)/applications engineer $100,512 - $125,024 $125,024- $160,096 $160,096 - $180,064
data scientist $93,93 - $125,000 $125,000 - $147,568 $147,568 - $175,088
embedded engineer $91,325 - $117,017 $117,017 - $139,309 $139,309 - $168,676
full-stack web developer $83,650 - $114,323 $114,323 - $142,398 $142,398 - $168,563
iOS Developer $69,984 - $88,480 $88,480 - $117,472 $117,472 - $145,632
JavaScript developer $90,032 - $114,416 $114,416 - $151,533 $151,533 - $167,946
machine learning engineer $100,704 - $130,016 $130,016 - $160,096 $160,096 - $180,064
mobile developer (iOS, Android, W8) $85,024 - $114,400 $114,400 - $145,632 $145,632 - $175,072
native mobile developer $43,984 - $61,392 $61,392 - $83,248 $83,248 - $119,600
Python developer $100,000 - $125,024 $125,024 - $151,776 $151,776 - $176,864
React Developer $71,008 - $90,048 $90,048 - $114,048 $114,048 - $140,032
software/back-end engineer $87,791 - $117,747 $117,747 - $140,462 $140,462 - $170,102
solution architecture
solutions architect $72,816 - $100,016 $100,016 - $125,040 $125,040 - $156,016
web and app design
graphic designer $55,775 - $83,326 $83,326 - $128,978 $128,978 - $149,528
PHP developer $77,472 - $105,570 $105,570 - $137,343 $137,343 - $174,684
Ruby developer $102,496 - $125,024 $125,024 - $152,544 $152,544 - $175,072
UI/visual designer $74,533 - $112,694 $112,694 - $134,367 $134,367 - $162,668
UX/interaction designer $86,994 - $113,816 $113,816 - $146,317 $146,317 - $166,486
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